Author Topic: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users  (Read 11063 times)

Offline rick0612

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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2012, 07:52:29 AM »
Great idea.

I would like to suggest a piece on the different ways to install PCLOS. Perhaps discuss the advantages and disadvantages of dual boot, replacing Windows completely, virtualizing, USB vs HDD and any other methods.
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Offline Rudge

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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #16 on: October 21, 2012, 11:35:47 PM »
Sounds like this could take quite a few issues to cover completely.

Nice "ongoing" theme to keep us all busy.

( Mostly,, I just commented so I would get "updates" on this thread.  )  ::) ::) ::) 
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Offline uncleV

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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2012, 12:09:59 AM »
Great idea!

Though for an usual Windows user all that stuff looks looong and scarrry. :o ;)

That's why I'd start with a short preface made in simple words.
I'd explain in one of the first places what is an OS and why it is.
Many of them don't know this. For them computer=Windows and Windows=computer. :(

At the end of the preface I'd briefly describe that they could just try Linux safely in LiveCD session. So they could initially try it without reading all that scary stuff ;)

Otherwise many of them will just leave those crazy linox geeks page. :D
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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2012, 02:53:40 PM »
Great idea!

Though for an usual Windows user all that stuff looks looong and scarrry. :o ;)

That's why I'd start with a short preface made in simple words.
I'd explain in one of the first places what is an OS and why it is.
Many of them don't know this. For them computer=Windows and Windows=computer. :(

At the end of the preface I'd briefly describe that they could just try Linux safely in LiveCD session. So they could initially try it without reading all that scary stuff ;)

Otherwise many of them will just leave those crazy linox geeks page. :D

Way too many think that Windows = computer and their computer = Windows

I do think that one should also mention when running a LiveCD where they are able to go if they have issues running said LiveCD
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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #19 on: October 22, 2012, 04:21:58 PM »
I've dealt in the past and still do occasionally with situations where people are frustrated with Windows, wish for an alternative (Not really knowing what those are except the expensive Mac) and yet know nothing about Linux to trust whether to use it. So you want to keep this simple, yet informative and to the point. You also want to show why someone might change from Windows. I discuss Linux with everyone I meet almost who wants to talk to me about technology because I'm know as someone who is a "Computer Whiz" which really boils down to me knowing enough about viruses to get rid of them, knowing how to switch a computer on and helping set up a network because that's the perception people have of what advanced computer folks are like.

But I digress. The point I'm making is this, if you show someone an alternative from what they currently use their most likely response will be "So what makes this different/better to what I already use" now we could take a holier-than-thou approach, show our immaturity by bamboozaling people with advance geek-speak or we could reason and really get down to the nuts and bolts of the reasons why Linux is a better, maybe not in the minds of Windows users, superior but at the very least enticing enough to try.

I would suggest highlighting several things, such as usability on older computer technology. I have a Lenovo B500 with an Intel Core 2 Duo 2.9Ghz chip and a dedicated 1GB ATIRadeonHD card. It works just as good, if not better in resource handling on Linux to my 2010 iMac i3 computer and yet there is a difference in CPU and GFX cards between the two. So people get longevity out of their computers beyond the shelf-life determined by Microsoft which is a great plus in my book when you consider we keep getting told the economy is bust (Well I do here in the UK lol)

The other thing is people are used to what they know, so they use MSOffice, well I encourage people to try LibreOffice BEFORE switching to Linux because it's not a hassle and they begin to utilize alternative software, proof of this in my experience was changing an architect from using AutoCAD to BrycsCAD which runs on Linux (.Deb and .RPM packages) which he found to be a much cheaper and more efficient alternative. So maybe highlight the equivalent software packages to show people it's not all about CLI's and "geek" stuff.

DE's are great to highlight but you want to highlight them as useful to specific people. Someone who wants a migrate from their beefed Win7 machine is likely to find KDE suitable. Someone who wants to migrate from their old XP machine might find LXDE suitable without hardware upgrades. People's biggest hurdle is always WLAN and GFX drivers, so maybe highlight some of the things PCLOS can cater for and let them check against their own hardware spec to see if the change is suited, we don't want people changing and then getting angry because their WLAN is unsupported or the drivers cause hardware conflicts as I recently experienced on a laptop I am running Linux on because these things make people think twice about why Linux should be used if it can't even do a "simple" thing like wirelessly connect or run their graphics cards.

Anyway I could go on but there's some food for thought from my experience in this.

Regards,
Jal
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Offline smileeb

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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #20 on: October 23, 2012, 10:36:03 AM »
The magazine was mentioned as a tool to help new members learn about linux and PCLinuxOS. I also think that maybe The Geek Stuff and Makeuseof could be added because there is some great stuff in their archives.
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Offline Phil

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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #21 on: October 26, 2012, 09:53:51 AM »
+10, good idea.

I would prefer to have all the information NOW, rather than in monthly installments over six months. Perhaps the article could be the outline as you have suggested with each section linked to a web section?

Additional section - something like things I wished I had known. eg backing up your system, backing up files (rsync), backing up .kde4, remembering to regularly update the machine, read the forums......

Also have one author and as many helpers as needed.

(was there a section on dual booting?)

(maybe a section on how to recover your windows system if it all goes horribly wrong)

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Offline parnote

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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #22 on: October 26, 2012, 11:15:07 AM »
I would prefer to have all the information NOW, rather than in monthly installments over six months. Perhaps the article could be the outline as you have suggested with each section linked to a web section?

In one short answer: NO. What good would this do for users having difficulty setting up their internet connection? The "collected" articles will later appear in a Special Edition of the magazine, after all the articles have been written and appeared in the monthly magazine -- just as we've done with all of the other Special Editions of the magazine.

Additional section - something like things I wished I had known. eg backing up your system, backing up files (rsync), backing up .kde4, remembering to regularly update the machine, read the forums......

Also have one author and as many helpers as needed.

As with almost all other series in the magazine, there WILL be multiple authors. The magazine staff is a VOLUNTEER staff, who also happen to have lives away from the magazine. We work, we have families, we have other activities -- call it life -- that also require our attention. Given how so very, very, very few members of the PCLinuxOS community are willing to write and submit articles for publication in the magazine, you are describing a situation that is completely outside even the remotest of possibilities of what we can achieve. I am the editor of the magazine, and I will have a hand in all the articles that are published. I suspect (rather, I know) that Meemaw, the assistant editor of the magazine, will be just as involved as I am.

It's fine to come up with a "wish list" of things that we all "wish we knew" when we started with PCLinuxOS. But we also have to remember that we a) must leave some things for the user to discover/learn later, and b) that we MUST limit the scope of the articles to helping Windows refugees in getting a basic PCLinuxOS system up and running, and show them how to use PCLinuxOS to perform the most common tasks that they would normally perform under Windows. If we don't limit the scope, then you're talking about writing a book that has no end. How many Windows users actually know how to do the similar tasks you list in your "things-I-wish-I-had-known" section? The number of those who know how to do it, vs those who actually perform them, are even smaller. While many of your ideas have merit, some of them may appear as a "Windows Migration" article, while others have a stronger chance of appearing as a regular article in the magazine that all PCLinuxOS users can benefit from. What we are discussing here is a series of "Windows Migration" articles, which will later be compiled into a Special Edition of the magazine for future reference for all who choose to migrate later. Anything outside the scope of "need-to-know" information for a user making that migration is ripe as a regular article in the magazine. Also, since the magazine is published monthly, that "other" information is something that ALL users can read on a regular basis, after they've made the migration to PCLinuxOS.

(was there a section on dual booting?)

(maybe a section on how to recover your windows system if it all goes horribly wrong)

I like the first one above. When I migrated to PCLinuxOS, I initially set up a dual boot system. After discovering that I almost never booted into Windows, I eliminated Windows from my computer's hard drive -- after I preserved all of my data.

The second one is, IMHO, one that is wrought with pitfalls, and one that has as many different solutions as there are hardware configurations out there in the wild. The better approach, I think, is to tell users to BE SURE to have backup media so they can reinstall Windows, should everything go horribly wrong. To try to recover your Windows system would take 10x as long as it would take to just simply reinstall it.

I'm a firm believer in the K.I.S.S. principle -- Keep It Super Simple. If we overwhelm these new users with 10 tons of information to digest, they are just going to go away with the idea that this whole endeavor just isn't worth it ... and they will return to using Windows. If we keep it simple and limited in scope to just that information they need to make the transition from the Windows world to the PCLinuxOS world, then we will have achieved our goal of assisting them and making their transition as smooth as possible.

I used to teach in a college (respiratory therapy instructor), and all so frequently I would have students who wanted to "know it all -- right now." One of my jobs was to hold them back a bit, until they had all the pieces of the puzzle necessary for them to have a complete understanding of the concepts that I was teaching them. It worked. I had one of the highest pass rates at the school, and most of those students came away with a much broader view of how everything fit together. It enabled my students to pass their national boards with a higher level of success, and it also made them better respiratory therapists when they entered the workforce.

Phil ... you have some good ideas. I hope you join the magazine staff in helping to produce these articles.

Paul Arnote [parnote]
PCLinuxOS Magazine Chief Editor
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Offline parnote

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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #23 on: October 26, 2012, 11:20:25 AM »
For the convenience of everyone involved, I have "stickied" this topic, to make it easier for everyone to find.

parnote
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Offline Phil

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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #24 on: October 26, 2012, 01:01:40 PM »

Its free?

What are the legalities of using this software and what is the catch?
If its "free" there must be a catch or its bad or illegal (etc, etc)






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Offline agmg

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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #25 on: October 26, 2012, 01:10:52 PM »
Thank you Parnote for making it sticky :)

I have already begun working on the first part of the article.
Some family matters are holding me back these days but I keep returning to it whenever I have spare time, even to add only a paragraph :P

The original plan was:

Downloading from Windows
(PCLinuxOS site, mirrors, torrents)
Creating liveCD or USB
(Free image burning software and liveUSB creators for Windows)
Live session
(What is a Live session, advantages and disadvantages)
Partitioning (Windows)
(Tools and tips for creating partitions and preparing installation of PCLinuxOS)
Partitioning with PCLinuxOS
(Creating partitions during setup, diskdrake, GParted, KDE Partition Manager)
Installation
(Single and dual boot scenarios)


It turns out to be much more difficult than I have thought. Not only there is too much information that I must handle in such a manner so the article won't turn away users migrating from Windows, but I also have to put myself in such a user's shoes constantly.
Try it and you'll see how tough it is :P
I must pretend that I know nothing about anything and my only guide is the stuff I write...

A simple example: I have completed the part on how to download the newest PCLinuxOS iso and create a LiveCD/DVD/USB. Go there, select mirror, use torrent if you like... But what about the different editions? A user coming from Windows will most certainly be unfamiliar with terms like KDE, Xfce etc. So, there should be a small introduction to PCLinuxOS versions and how they differ. But to do that, you must introduce a new (unknown to Windows users) term: the Desktop Environment... I think you get my point :)

I have read all suggestions and comments so far. Some of them are very useful some of them are simply impossible to fit in :)
Parnote has put it nicely: "If we don't limit the scope, then you're talking about writing a book that has no end."

As I've mentioned earlier in this thread, this series of articles is not intended to be the Swiss-army knife of PCLinuxOS.
Its intention is to help Windows users (who know nothing about Linux and how it works) to download, install and perform some basic operations (like update the system, install the programs they need, configure network/sound/graphics etc) to get the system up and running the way it should. Furthermore, it will discuss topics like the available Desktop Environments, the tools to configure the system (especially the unique Control Center), the alternatives to Windows programs and maybe some other stuff that need special mention (i.e. localization). For everything beyond that we have our Knowledge Base and our always helpful forum.

Try to keep your suggestions under that scope. And remember: it is impossible for a single person to cover all this stuff.
So I would like to know who is willing to help in writing :)
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Offline Yankee

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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #26 on: October 26, 2012, 01:19:11 PM »
I have already begun working on the first part of the article.

Sounds like you need a 8 to 10 point outline with one paragraph
summarizing the problem and one paragraph summarizing the solution
for each item in the outline.  Then a page or two for detailed explanations,
etc. for each item in the outline.   

regards,

FF
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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #27 on: October 26, 2012, 01:41:17 PM »
I'd like to second the notion that hardware/DE choice should be covered.

A brief explanation of computer hardware could be helpful - I cannot begin to count how many people I have dealt with who do not understand the difference between memory and storage, for instance.

Perhaps even a table showing hardware performance by desktop environment could be useful.  That is, on recent and powerful hardware, KDE with all effects on would be fine, but on a 1.8ghz Pentium 4 with 768MB of RAM it wouldn't, but LXDE would be fine.  Having some guidance on picking DE to match hardware strikes me as a reasonable thing to provide a neophyte Linux user.
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Offline parnote

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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #28 on: October 26, 2012, 03:12:41 PM »
I'd like to second the notion that hardware/DE choice should be covered.

A brief explanation of computer hardware could be helpful - I cannot begin to count how many people I have dealt with who do not understand the difference between memory and storage, for instance.

Perhaps even a table showing hardware performance by desktop environment could be useful.  That is, on recent and powerful hardware, KDE with all effects on would be fine, but on a 1.8ghz Pentium 4 with 768MB of RAM it wouldn't, but LXDE would be fine.  Having some guidance on picking DE to match hardware strikes me as a reasonable thing to provide a neophyte Linux user.

+1
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Offline smileeb

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Re: Project: Migrating from Windows - A guide for new users
« Reply #29 on: October 26, 2012, 05:54:30 PM »

A simple example: I have completed the part on how to download the newest PCLinuxOS iso and create a LiveCD/DVD/USB. Go there, select mirror, use torrent if you like... But what about the different editions? A user coming from Windows will most certainly be unfamiliar with terms like KDE, Xfce etc. So, there should be a small introduction to PCLinuxOS versions and how they differ. But to do that, you must introduce a new (unknown to Windows users) term: the Desktop Environment... I think you get my point Smiley


I think it would be wise to suggest that they down load all live versions and test them with all
their equipment hooked up. Some versions might run better on their system just like windows
cannot run on all systems. Another nice thing about linux it is free and you can test live CDs or
DVDs of of the OS to see what you think of it, but windows you have to buy and run it their way.
Linux you have a choice of how you want to run it.
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